8 inch triple trout

The 8 inch Triple Trout, showed its strength in the Ozarks section of Southern Trout Eaters. Good bait for covering water and seeing what happens when you are on a lake where 20 pounds is a good sack. How about those Owner ST-36 Stinger Trebles? That fish is punk rock with all those piercings.

The 8” Triple Trout is probably the most universal of the Triple Trout family in that it is a bigbait, and able to get big bites, but at 8 inches long, this is a good search and destroy bait in lakes that aren’t known for big fish.  But the 2-5 pounders will attack the 8” Triple Trout, given the right circumstances.

triple trout fishing on lake murray

The 8" Triple Trout is not just for 'trout eaters'. The bait is the standard for chasing the elusive blueback herring eaters of the South. Lake Murray, South Carolina, and a May stud off a point, fishing with Chris Koon.

The 8” Triple Trout is part of our ‘trout eater’ toolbox, and was featured in Southern Trout Eaters in the Ozark section, where we were documenting our first attempts at bigbait fishing in the Ozarks.  We were fishing a lake not known for double digit fish, had never fished the lake much and needed to cover water and see how the fish would react.  We ended up with multiple 15-20 pound sacks and we were able to document most of it on film and in photos.

Before Brad Rutherford could drive, he was throwing the 8" Triple Trout, a testament to Brad's fishing and where he is going in this sport.

The 8” Triple Trout is also a staple in the blue back herring assault we have been exploring for years.   Clarks Hill, Lake Lanier, Lake Murray and Lake Hartwell have all seen plenty of 8” Triple Trouts courtesy of our crew (Chris Koon, Brad&Bob Rutherford, Robert Malcom, and myself).   There is no question the 8” Triple Trout is gets bit when you get around blue back herring chasers.

clarks hill swimbait fishing

Clarks Hill, Fall of 2008. Working on the blueback herring bite around long sloping red clay points.

 

Bait: The 8” Triple Trout
Rod:  G-Loomis 965 BBR
Reel:  Shimano Calcutta 400 TE
Line:  P-Line CXX Green Coplymer, 25 pound
Hooks:  Owner ST-36 Treble Hooks (1/0 front and back)
Split Rings:  Owner Hyper Wire #6s

Strengths:  The 8” Triple Trout can be fished fast or fished at a steady grind, but you can  cover water with the bait and get a feel for how the fish are reacting.  The Triple Trout excels in warm water.  Anything above 60 degrees, and especially as the water gets into the 70s and low 80s, the Triple Trout is a good call in warm water.   Since you can start and stop the bait and make it do 180 degree turns and pauses, you can create a bite with your retrieve, so its a good bait for making fish that only follow a swimbait actually eat.   The 8” Triple Trout only weighs approx 2.5 ounces and is far less a workout to fish than the 10” Triple Trout.  It’s a good ‘starter’ bait for those just getting into the Triple Trout family of swimbaits.

triple trout fishing on lake guntersville

Lake Guntersville, 8 inch Triple Trout fished over shallow grass.

 

Ideal Conditions:  Anytime you can fish a bait with hanging trebles over submerged grass, we recommend the Triple Trout.  Anytime you are fishing a blue back herring lake, we recommend the Triple Trout fished around docks, off points, around brushpiles, off man made structure like breakwaters, rip rap, barge tie ups, etc, and certainly around laydown trees.   Lakes with that are trout fed are a no brainer for the Triple Trout, and as the water temps warm up, use the 8” Triple Trout to call up active fish and get them to eat even in the summer swelter.  You don’t need trout or blue backs to catch fish on the 8” Triple Trout, anywhere you are targeting 3-5 pound fish and know where they live, put on an 8” Triple Trout and see what happens.

brad rutherford swimbait fishing

Brad Rutherford, the first day we met, Clarks Hill, a little more grown up, giving me his "Matt Peters" pose...damn kids. Brad throwing a custom painted 8" Triple Trout blue back herring color.

 

Notes:  Tie directly to the bait.  Don’t use a snap to tie to.  Just tie directly to the bait and make sure you retie often.  The weight of the bait combined with big casts and repetitive casting make this a classic example of the physics of bigbait fishing we touched on in Southern Trout Eaters.  Carry spare tails, because if you get onto a good bite, there’s a chance a fish can rip or wreck your tail so don’t be unprepared.

ozark triple trout fishing

8" Triple Trout, light trout and an Ozark Trout Eater in bronze. When you are on a new lake, warm weather and water, need to cover water and have the highest odds of getting a bite, bust out your 8" Triple Trout in light trout and go to work.

 

Chartruese bass 8" Triple Trout. Lake Seminole sand bar fishing, the mouth of Spring Creek.

5 Responses »

  1. Jason Stubbs says:

    Hey Matt, iv seen in southern trout eaters you like to burn your triple trout with a start and stop retrieve. I recently bought an 8 inch triple trout and when I burn it it just rolls over on its side. And when I stop it it does the same thing. It has a nice swim on a slow to medium retrieve but try to fish it fast or stop it and it rolls on its side. Just wondering if you had ever come across this with any of your triple trout baits. Thanks for the help.

  2. Greg says:

    Excellent info on the faimly of triple trouts Matt. You got me started throwing the 8″ and 10″ triple trouts and I have never looked back! Keep up the good work!

    • southernswimbait says:

      Aloha Greg! Thank you. I’ve been slacking on fishing, but I needed to recharge the batteries! More to come, be patient! MP

  3. Jason Stubbs says:

    Hey Matt, i reacently bought an 8inch triple trout but when I try to burn it with a quick stop and go retrieve it wants to roll on its side. Everything iv herd about triple trouts no one seems to have this but me. Just wondering if you have ever encountered this with any of your triple trout baits? Any input would be much appreciated.

    • southernswimbait says:

      Have you messed with the tail? You need to definitely put on a new tail and try to ‘tune’ the bait against the tail. Secondly, are you fishing with a snap? If not, go ahead and try it. I prefer no snap, but it works awfully good still with a snap. I fished it with a snap for years, works great. But no snap give you better control on your stalls and twitches. Last, have you tried a high speed low profile reel and 65# braid? Try ‘high sticking’ your retrieve. Keeps it really near the surface, wake style. Try fishing it high stick and then stall and pause, using braid. Try that. But yeah, some baits, I don’t care who makes them…suck.

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